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Archaeological Center

The University of Utah Archaeological Center is a research and teaching arm of the Department of Anthropology. Originally founded in 1948 as the "Statewide Archaeological Survey," its original mission was to investigate the prehistoric archaeology of Utah. It was renamed in 1978 and its mission broadened. The Archaeological Center now coordinates research that explores past and present human behavior from the perspective of evolutionary ecology. Research involves studying modern hunter-gatherers and their archaeological record. Resulting data is then used in archaeological studies of prehistoric hunter-gatherers and simple agriculturalists who occupied Utah and adjacent regions for nearly 10,000 years.


The Center, in partnership
with the Utah Museum of Natural History (UMNH), coordinates the research activities in Range Creek Canyon. Data and artifacts collected by the Center are curated
by the UMNH and are available for study by competent scholars. Reports of the Center's activities appear regularly in the professional literature. Opportunities for student participation in the Center's research are available. For more information on the Archaeological Field School in Range Creek Canyon visit: Archaeology Field School.



The Archaeological Center
270 S. 1400 East Rm. 113
University of Utah
Salt Lake City, UT 84116


Core Faculty

Director: Brian F. Codding (Ph.D. Stanford University, 2012; Assistant Professor). Human behavioral ecology, foraging economics, anthropogenic fire, gender division of labor, ethnoarchaeology, ethno-ecology, data analysis, GIS; Australia and North America. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Jack M. Broughton (Ph.D. University of Washington, 1995; Professor). Zooarchaeology, evolutionary ecology, paleozoogeography; western North America. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Joan Brenner Coltrain (Ph.D. University of Utah, 1997; Research Associate Professor). Archaeological method and theory, stable isotope chemistry; Great Basin, eastern Arctic. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Duncan Metcalfe (Ph.D. University of Utah, 1987; Associate Professor). Archaeological method and theory, evolutionary ecology; western North America. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

James F. O'Connell (Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, 1971; Professor Emeritus). Hunter-gatherer ecology, archaeological method and theory; Australia, Africa, North America. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Richard R. Paine (Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, 1992; Asstistant Professor). Archaeology, prehistoric demography, complex societies, human/land relationships; Mesoamerica, Europe. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Affiliated Faculty

Kristen Hawkes (Ph.D. University of Washington, 1976; Distinguished Professor). Behavioral ecology, sociobiology, hunter-gatherers. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Alan R. Rogers (Ph.D. University of New Mexico, 1982; Professor). Population genetics, evolutionary ecology. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Karen Kramer (Ph.D. University of New Mexico; Associate Professor). Behavioral ecology, demography, comparative life history and reproductive ecology, the evolution of juvenility, cooperative breeding, intergenerational transfers. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Archaeological Center Report of Activities, including a list of publications by associated faculty and students, are available here: 1998-2002, 2002-2010.



Intermountain Antiquities Computer System (IMACS) Guide

The Utah State Historic Preservation Office now maintains and edits the IMACS Guide, which is available on line, at no charge, as downloadable pdf files. Click here to access the pdfs.

Pocket- or reduced-size manuals are no longer available from the Archaeological Center.