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Jack M. Broughton

Professor
213G Stewart
801-581-8869

Areas of Specialization

Zooarchaeology, evolutionary ecology, human paleoecology; North American Prehistory (especially California and the Great Basin)

Research

My research interests involve hunter-gatherer paleoecology and prehistory, especially the analysis of human- and climate-induced change in past faunal landscapes, and their implications for related aspects of human behavior, historical ecology, and modern conservation biology. The archaeofaunal record of past foraging behavior is the primary window through which I explore these issues; quantitative applications of foraging theory models to such records in western North America constitutes the core of my empirical work. In this context, I have analyzed late Quaternary archaeological and paleontological fish, bird, and mammal faunas from across the west. These substantive analyses reflect my general interest in the application of models from evolutionary ecology to the archaeological record of ancient human behavior. Ongoing projects involve the analysis of avian prey choice and patch use by ancient hunters of the San Francisco Bay area; Holocene climate change, artiodactyl population histories, and large game hunting patterns in California, Baja California, and the Great Basin; and ancient DNA tests for a proposed human-caused late Holocene population decline in California tule elk.

Selected Publications

Broughton, J.M., R.K. Beck, J.B. Coltrain, D.H. O'Rourke, and A.R. Rogers.  2013. A late Holocene population bottleneck in California tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes): Provisional support from ancient DNA. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory (2013) 20:495-524.  pdf

Broughton, J.M., M.D. Cannon, F.E. Bayham, and D.A. Byers. 2011. Prey body size and ranking in zooarchaeology: Theory, empirical evidence, and applications from the northern Great Basin. American Antiquity 76(3): 403-428.  pdf

Byers, D. A., D. R. Yesner, J. M. Broughton, and J. B. Coltrain. (2011). Stable isotope chemistry, population histories, and Late Prehistoric subsistence change in the Aleutian Islands. Journal of Archaeological Science 38:183-196.

Broughton, J.M. and M. D. Cannon (eds.). 2010. Evolutionary Ecology and Archaeology: Applications to Problems in Human Evolution and Prehistory. University of Utah Press.

Broughton, J.M. 2010. Prey spatial structure and behavior affect archaeological tests of optimal foraging models: examples from the Emeryville Shellmound vertebrate fauna. IN: Evolutionary Ecology and Archaeology: Applications to Problems in Human Evolution and Prehistory, ed. J. M. Broughton and M. D. Cannon, pp. 192-207.University of Utah Press.

Broughton, J.M., M. D. Cannon, and E. J. Bartelink. (2010). Evolutionary ecology, resource depression, and niche construction theory: applications to central California hunter-gatherers and Mimbres-Mogollon agriculturalists. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory 17:371-421.  pdf

M. D. Cannon and J. M. Broughton. 2010. Evolutionary ecology and archaeology: an introduction. IN: Evolutionary Ecology and Archaeology: Applications to Problems in Human Evolution and Prehistory, ed. J. M. Broughton and M. D. Cannon, pp. 1-12. University of Utah Press.

Cannon, M. D., S. D. Livingston, and J. M. Broughton. 2009. Faunal Remains from the Sunshine Locality. In, The Archaeology of the Eastern Nevada Paleoarchaic, Part 1: The Sunshine Locality, University of Utah Anthropological Papers 126, pp. 218-228, ed. by C. Beck and G. T. Jones. University of Utah Press.

Broughton, J.M., D.A Byers, R.A. Bryson, W. Eckerle, and D.B. Madsen. 2008. Did climatic seasonality control late Quaternary artiodactyl densities in western North America? Quaternary Science Reviews, 27:1916-1937. pdf

Broughton, J.M., D. Mullins, and T. Ekker. 2007. Avian resource depression or intertaxonomic variation in bone density? A test with San Francisco Bay avifaunas. Journal of Archaeological Science 34: 374-391.  pdf

Broughton, J.M., Cannon, V. I., Bogiatto, R.J., Arnold, S. and Dalton, K. 2006. The taphonomy of owl-deposited fish remains and the origin of the Homestead Cave ichthyofauna. Journal of Taphonomy 4:69-95.  pdf

Bogiatto, R.J., Broughton, J.M., Cannon, V. I., Arnold, S. and Dalton, K. 2006. Fish remains dominate Barn Owl pellets in northwestern Nevada. Western North American Naturalist 66:395-396.  pdf

Byers, D.A. , C. Smith, and J.M. Broughton. 2005. Holocene artiodactyl population histories and large game hunting in the Wyoming Basin, USA. Journal of Archaeological Science 32:125-142.  pdf

Broughton, J.M. 2004. Prehistoric Human Impacts on California Birds: Evidence from the Emeryville Shellmound Avifauna. Ornithological Monographs 56. 

Broughton, J.M. 2004. Declines in mammalian foraging efficiency during the late Holocene, San Francisco Bay. IN: Prehistoric California: Archaeology and the Myth of Paradise , ed. by L. M. Raab and T. Jones, pp. 34-52. University of Utah Press.

Broughton, J.M. 2004. A late Pleistocene record of Humboldt cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki subsp.) from Mineral Hill Cave, Northeastern Nevada. IN: Paleontological Investigations at Mineral Hill Cave , ed. B. Hockett and E. Dillingham. Contribution to the Study of Cultural Resources Technical Report No. 18 (BLM Nevada).  pdf

Broughton, J.M. 2004. Pristine benchmarks and indigenous conservation? Implications from California zooarchaeology. IN: The Future from the Past: Archaeozoology in Wildlife Conservation and Heritage Management , pp. 6-18. ed. R. Lauwerrier and I. Plug, Oxbow Books, Oxford.

Byers, D.A. and J.M. Broughton. 2004. Holocene environmental change, artiodactyl abundances, and human hunting strategies in the Great Basin. American Antiquity 69:235-256. pdf

Broughton, J.M. and Bayham, F.E. 2003. Showing off, foraging models, and the ascendance of hunting in the California Middle Archaic. American Antiquity 68:783-789.  pdf

Broughton, J.M. 2002. Prey spatial structure and behavior affect archaeological tests of optimal foraging models: examples from the Emeryville Shellmound vertebrate fauna. World Archaeology 34: 60-83.  pdf

Broughton, J.M., Rampton, D., and Holanda, K. 2002.A test of an osteologically-based age determination method in the Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus). Ibis 144: 143-146.  pdf

Broughton, J.M. 2002. Human optimal foraging strategies: an overview, pp. 521-523. IN: Encyclopedia of Evolution , ed. M. Pagel, Oxford Univ. Press.

Broughton, J.M. 2002. Why Didn't Native Californians Farm?, pp.522. IN: Encyclopedia of Evolution , ed. M. Pagel, Oxford Univ. Press.

Broughton, J.M. 2002. Pre-Columbian human impact on California vertebrates: evidence from old bones and implications for wilderness policy. IN: Wilderness and Political Ecology: Aboriginal Influences and the Original State of Nature , edited by C.E. Kay, and R. T. Simmons. University of Utah Press.

Broughton, J.M. 2001. Resource Intensification and Late Holocene Human Impacts on Pacific Coast Bird Populations: Evidence from the Emeryville Shellmound Avifauna IN: Posing Questions for a Scientific Archaeology , edited by T. Hunt, C. Lipo, and S. Sterling. Bergin and Garvey. London.

Rogers, A.R. and Broughton, J.M. 2001. Selective transport of animal parts by ancient hunters: a new statistical method and an application to the Emeryville Shellmound fauna. Journal of Archaeological Science 28:763-773.  pdf

Madsen, D. B., Rhode, D., Grayson, D.K., Broughton, J. M., Livingston, S. D., Hunt, J., Quade, J., Schmitt, D. N., and Shaver, M.W. 2001. Late Quaternary environmental change in the Bonneville Basin, Western USA. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 167: 243-271.  pdf

Huckleberry, G., Beck, C., Jones, G., Holmes, A., Cannon, M., Livingston, S., and Broughton, J.M. 2001. Terminal Pleistocene/Early Holocene environmental change at the Sunshine Locality, north-central Nevada, U.S.A. Quaternary Research 55:303-312.

Broughton, J.M. 2000. The Homestead Cave Ichthyofauna, pp. 103-121. IN: Late Quaternary Paleoecology in the Bonneville Basin , ed. D. Madsen. Utah Geological Survey Bulletin 130. pdf

Broughton, J.M. 2000. Cathedral Cave Fishes, pp. 134-135. IN: Late Quaternary Paleoecology in the Bonneville Basin , ed. D. Madsen. Utah Geological Survey Bulletin 130. 

Broughton, J.M. 2000.Terminal Pleistocene fish remains from Homestead Cave, Utah, and implications for fish biogeography in the Bonneville basin. Copeia 2000:645-656. pdf  

Broughton, J.M., Madsen, D.B., and Quade, J. 2000.Fish remains from Homestead Cave and lake levels of the past 13,000 years in the Bonneville Basin. Quaternary Research 53: 392-401.  pdf

Broughton, J.M. 1999. Resource Depression and Intensification During the Late Holocene, San Francisco Bay: Evidence from the Emeryville Shellmound Vertebrate Fauna. University of California Anthropological Records 32. 11.

Broughton, J.M., and O'Connell, J.F. 1999. On evolutionary ecology, selectionist archaeology, and behavioral archaeology. American Antiquity 62:153-165.  pdf

Broughton, J.M. 1997. Widening diet breadth, declining foraging efficiency, and prehistoric harvest pressure: ichthyofaunal evidence from the Emeryville Shellmound. Antiquity 71: 845-862.  pdf

Broughton, J.M. ed.1996. Excavation of the Emeryville Shellmound, 1906: Nels C. Nelson's Final Report . Contributions of the University of California Archaeological Research Facility 54.

Broughton, J.M. 1994. Declines in mammalian foraging efficiency during the late Holocene, San Francisco Bay, California. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 13: 371-401.  pdf

Broughton, J.M. 1994. Late Holocene resource intensification in the Sacramento Valley, California: the vertebrate evidence. Journal of Archaeological Science 21:501-514.  pdf

Broughton, J.M. 1993. Size of the Bursa of Fabricius in relation to gonad size and age in Laysan and Black-footed Albatrosses. The Condor 96:203-207.  pdf

Broughton, J.M. and Grayson, D.K. 1993. Diet breadth, adaptive change, and the White Mountains faunas. Journal of Archaeological Science 20:331-336. pdf

Broughton, J.M. and Buckskin, F. 1992. Racing Simloki's shadow: the Ajumawi interconnection of power, shadow, equinox, and solstice. IN: Earth and Sky: Visions of the Cosmos in Native American Folklore , edited by C. Farrer and R. Williamson. University of New Mexico Press. Pp. 184-191.